Romney’s Hispanic chairman cites candidate’s mistakes

Carlos Gutierrez, the man who led Mitt Romney’s outreach to Hispanic voters, said Sunday the candidate “made some mistakes” during his campaign that did much to deter Latino voters. The former secretary of commerce blamed the Republican primary process, which he said forced Romney to harden his immigration stance in an appeal to the far-right wing of the Republican Party.

“Mitt Romney made some mistakes,” Gutierrez said. “I think he is an extraordinary man, and I think he made an extraordinary candidate. I think Mitt Romney’s comments are a symptom. I think the disease is the fact that the far right of the party controls the primary process.”

On immigration, Romney often sought to balance his positions in ways that appealed both to Hispanic voters and the base of the Republican Party. In December, Romney vowed to veto the DREAM Act if he became president, saying instead he would support a path to residency – not citizenship – for undocumented immigrants who served in the military, but not other DREAM Act proposals. Later, Romney gave a more detailed version of his stance, telling supporters at a fund-raiser in Florida that Republicans needed to offer their own version of the DREAM Act.

At a Republican presidential debate in January, Romney said he favored a system of “self-deportation,” a policy that involves making economic conditions so difficult for undocumented workers that they choose to leave the country to find better opportunities. That stance was derided both by Democrats and his Republican rivals.

Speaking Sunday, Gutierrez said Latino voters were scared of a Republican Party they regarded as anti-immigrant and downright xenophobic. “They were scared of the anti-immigration talk. They were scared of xenophobes. It’s almost as if we’re living in the past,” Gutierrez added.

The proof, he said, was in the exit polling data: 27% cast ballots for Romney, compared to 31% who voted for Sen. John McCain in 2008 and 44% who supported George W. Bush in 2004.

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